On Borrowing Light

The growth of students in the understanding of Christian Science is very seriously retarded by the practice of trying to borrow light every time they come to a dark place in their progress. In running hither and thither for advice or explanations, we are likely to get nothing but a medley of human opinions, which do not inform but confuse us. Even if the advice or instruction given were en-tirely good, it could little aid us. The Christian Scientist can make profitable use of very little wisdom over and above what he has acquired through the earnest struggle to prove the primary facts of Being.

Apologizing for the contempt Robert Burns showed for the unsolicited advice of pious friends in his youth, one of his biographers says that advice is very nearly worthless for two reasons: first, that only a fool needs it; and second, that one who is fool enough to need advice, would not be wise enough to heed it. This is merely a clever saying, which is really not true, but is the exaggerated shadow of a truth. The wisest men often seek advice, but even they make sparing use of it, for it often demands more wisdom to follow advice than to give it.

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The Legal Aspect of Christian Science
August 10, 1899
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